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Washington formally proclaims an end to hostilities with England...



Item # 605336

April 30, 1783

THE PENNSYLVANIA JOURNAL & THE WEEKLY ADVERTISER, Philadelphia, April 30, 1783

* Significant Revolutionary War newspaper!

* "Washington's General Orders" to the officers and troops of the Continental Army announce the "...cessation of Hostilities between the United States of America and the King of Great Britain..."

*
Haym Salomon ad - Revolutionary War financier


Page 2 contains one of the most historically significant documents of the Revolutionary War, being Washington's official proclamation to this officers announcing the end of hostilities with England. Keep in mind that on April 11 Congress formally proclaimed an end to the war, and on April 15 Congress ratified the preliminary peace treaty with England.
Taking close to a full column is a document datelined: "Head Quarters, April 18, 1783" which begins: "The commander in chief orders the cessation of hostilities between the United States of America and the king of Great Britain to be publickly proclaimed tomorrow at twelve o'clock...and that the proclamation which will be communicated herewith be read to-morrow evening at the head of every regiment & corps of the army; after which the chaplains with the several brigades will render thanks to Almighty God for all his mercies, particular for his over ruling the wrath of man to his own glory, and causing the rage of war to cease among the nations...". Much more follows noting Washington's comments. This was the official "Washington's General Orders" to the officers and troops of the Continental Army announce the "...cessation of Hostilities between the United States of America and the King of Great Britain..." He congratulates the Army, noting that those who have performed the "...meanest office..." have participated in a great drama "...on the stage of human affairs..." "...Nothing now remains but for the actors of this mighty Scene to preserve a perfect, unvarying, consistency of character through the very last act; to close the Drama with applause; and to retire from the Military Theatre with the same approbation of Angels and men which have crowned all their former virtuous actions."  The report ends with: "An extra ration of liquor to be issued to every man tomorrow, to drink Perpetual Peace, Independence and Happiness to the United States of America." Be sure to read the full text to appreciate one of the more beautifully written documents of the 18th century. (see this hyperlink for a web transcription of the text)
Although it pales by comparison, there is other fine content in this issue as well, including a front page report from England noting in part: "...incontrovertible fact that the largest & best masts that the navy of Great Britain ever used came from New England...The more we reflect on the loss of our once flourishing colonies, the source of our fame, splendor & riches, the more we execrate & loath those men who, by their folly & ignorance, caused them to be dismembered from the British crown. Those wretched men who lost America were highly displeased with General Washington, because he would not fight--and certainly it was unpolite in him not to oblige them--for had he fought probably America might have been really 'at the feet of the Minister' by this time..." with more (see).
Page 2 also has an interesting item from Boston noting: "...that some of the latest news papers...from New York are still stuffed with virulent & opprobrious language against the Americans, notwithstanding it is well known in that city that their beset of Kings has long ago acknowledged these states Sovereign & Independent..." (see). Page 3 has a detailed ad by 'Haym Salomon", a leading Jewish financier during the Revolutionary War (see).
See the great masthead engraving, one of the nicest of the Revolutionary War era. Four pages, very nice, clean condition.

Category: The 1600's and 1700's

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