Home > Mention of the Declaration of Independence... July 4, 1776 had been set as a day of prayer and fasting... Comments on Common Sense...
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Mention of the Declaration of Independence...

July 4, 1776 had been set as a day of prayer and fasting... Comments on Common Sense...



Item # 596322

September 2, 1776

EDINBURGH EVENING COURANT, Scotland, Sept. 2, 1776  Page 2 has a notable report which includes: "A letter from Philadelphia...says, 'the 4th of July 1776 the Americans appointed as a day of fasting and prayer, preparatory to their dedicating the country to god, which was done in the following manner: The Congress being assembled, after having declared American independent, they had a crown placed on a bible which by prayer and solemn devotion they offered to God. This religious ceremony being ended they divided the crown into thirteen parts each of the united provinces taking a part." and also: "We are credibly informed that the Congress have removed their sittings from Philadelphia to Lancaster, which removal is supposed to be occasioned by an expected visit at the former place from the British troops."
What follows is a nice account of the attack upon Charleston by the British, which was victorious for the Americans under General Charles Lee (see).
Another item begins: "A pamphlet has been circulated here under the title of 'Common Sense', which was sent hither from America. It is written with great virulence against the English administration, and its design is to stir up the colonists to assert their independency on the mother country..." and what follow is a quote from Common Sense refuted by the writer: "I have seen a pamphlet published in Philadelphia under the title of Common Sense wherein the author says that 40 years ago there were 70 and 80 gun ships built in New England: in answer to which I do declare..." with more (see).
Page 3 has an item concerning colonial currency from Georgia, with a printing of the text (see). More American content as well.
Four pages, folio size, nice condition.

Category: Revolutionary War

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