Home > Back to Search Results > Will the Mormons leave? On the assassination of Joseph Smith... America's first African-American lawyer...
Click image to enlarge 685124
Show image list »

Will the Mormons leave? On the assassination of Joseph Smith... America's first African-American lawyer...



Item # 685124

Currently Unavailable. Contact us if you would like to be placed on a want list or to be notified if a similar item is available.



July 27, 1844

NILES' NATIONAL REGISTER, Baltimore, July 27, 1844

* Mormons - Mormonism
* re. Joseph Smith assassination
* Macon Bolling Allen
* 1st black lawyer


 Pages 4 and 5 contain a nearly full-column article on: "The Mormons" focused on driving the Mormons out of Illinois, and a bit on the assassination of Joseph Smith & his brother.
A few bits include: "...exhibits on the part of the anti-mormons a headstrong determination to persist i the which is, in its essence irrational...Their suffrages (the mormons) have been, from the first, a bone of contention among politicians...there can be no compromise between the two parties. It is out of question they are greatly our superior in numbers and we cannot coincide in their faith. They must leave, or we must leave...Which party shall leave, and in what manner?..." then the report tends more to the situation of the murder of the Smiths. 
The back page has a very small & inconspicuous report which is notable in African-American history.
Headed: "Colored Lawyer" it reports that: "Macon B. Allen, a colored man, after some difficulty, has been regularly admitted to the bar, at Portland, Maine; the first we presume in this country."
This was Macon Bolling Allen who has the distinction of being the first African-American to become a lawyer, argue before a jury, and hold a judicial position in the United States.
Four pages, 8 1/2 by 12 inches, good condition.

As noted in Wikipedia, this title: "...(was) one of the most widely-circulated magazines in the United States...Devoted primarily to politics...considered an important source for the history of the period."

Category: Pre-Civil War