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Richard Byrd's Trans-Atlantic Flight....



Item # 678299

July 01, 1927

THE NEW YORK TIMES, July 1, 1927.

* Richard Byrd's Transatlantic flight in fog

The front page has has a nice three line, full banner headline: "BYRD FLIES FOR HOURS IN FOG OVER FRANCE SEEKING FOR PARIS AND A PLACE TO LAND; LAST MESSAGE FROM HIM AN SOS NEAR DAWN", with related subheads and a nice photo of Richard Evelyn Byrd.  Additionally, there is a related map on page 2.
This issue is believed to be complete in 40+ pages, however, it is being offered for described content. A little margin wear, a slightly rough left spine, but good for the era. See images for details.

Background (Wikipedia): Byrd was one of several aviators who attempted to win the Orteig Prize in 1927 for making the first nonstop flight between the United States and France. Once again Byrd named Floyd Bennett as his chief pilot, with support from Bernt Balchen, Bert Acosta, and George Noville. During a practice takeoff with Bennett alone at the controls, the Fokker Trimotor airplane, America, crashed, severely injuring Bennett. As the plane was being repaired, Charles Lindbergh won the prize. But Byrd continued with his quest, naming Balchen to replace Bennett as chief pilot. Byrd, Balchen, Acosta, and Noville flew from Roosevelt Field East Garden City, New York on June 29, 1927. Arriving over France, cloud cover prevented a landing in Paris; they returned to the coast of Normandy, crash-landing without fatalities on July 1, 1927.

Item from Catalog 308 (released for July, 2021)...

Category: The 20th Century