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Item # 559056

February 22, 1862

NEW YORK DAILY TRIBUNE, New York City, February 22, 1862.

* Fort Donelson Tennessee
* Clarksville TN

This Genuine newspaper has a Wealth of Civil War reporting from during Abraham Lincoln's administration.

The back page has a map titled:

* FORT DONELSON AND ITS SURROUNDINGS

Among the one column headlines on the Civil War are:

* THE WAR FOR THE UNION
* Movements of the Manassas Rebels

* GLORIOUS NEWS FROM TENNESSEE
* The People of Nashville Protesting Against a Battle
* CLARKSVILLE CAPTURED
* GEN. SMITH OCCUPIES THE TOWN
* PRICE'S ARMY AGAIN DEFEATED

and more.

Complete in eight pages. This issue is not fragile as newsprint from this era was made of cotton and linen rags, allowing them to remain very pliable and easy to handle. Little margin wear, otherwise in good condition.

wikipedia notes:
The Battle of Fort Donelson was fought from February 11 to February 16, 1862, in the Western Theater of the American Civil War. The capture of the fort by Union forces opened the Cumberland River as an avenue of invasion of the South and elevated Brig. Gen. Ulysses S. Grant from an obscure and largely unproven leader to the rank of major general, earning him the nickname "Unconditional Surrender" Grant in the process.

The battle followed the capture of Fort Henry on February 6. Grant moved his army 12 miles overland to Fort Donelson on February 12 through February 13 and conducted several small probing attacks. (Although the name was not yet in use, the troops serving under Grant were the nucleus of the Union's very consequential and successful Army of the Tennessee.[1]) On February 14, U.S. Navy gunboats under Flag Officer Andrew H. Foote attempted to reduce the fort with naval gunfire, but were forced to withdraw after sustaining heavy damage from Donelson's water batteries.

On February 15, with their fort surrounded, the Confederates, commanded by Brig. Gen. John B. Floyd, launched a surprise attack against Grant's army, attempting to open an avenue of escape. Grant, who was away from the battlefield at the start of the attack, arrived to rally his men and counterattack. Despite achieving a partial success, Floyd lost his nerve and recalled his men back into their entrenchments.

On the morning of February 16, Floyd and his second-in-command, Brig. Gen. Gideon J. Pillow, both turned over their command to Brig. Gen. Simon Bolivar Buckner, who agreed to unconditional surrender terms from Grant.

Category: Yankee