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Leading up to the infamous beating of Senator Sumner by Rep. Brooks...



Item # 653012

May 20, 1856

DAILY NATIONAL INTELLIGENCER, Washington, D.C., May 20, 1856  In the annals of Congressional history few events would prove as bazaar as the beating of Senator Charles Sumner on the floor of the Senate by Representative Preston Brooks. Many website provide the details, however in short, an anti-slavery speech by Sumner so enraged Brooks that he severely beat Sumner with a walking stick.
This issue of 2 days prior to the infamous event reports on an event which would be the provocation.
Page 3 has an editorial which reports on the beginning of Sumner's two day speech focused on the "crimes against Kansas" as it has become known. Portions include: "...Mr. Sumner then commenced before a large auditory the delivery of a speech on the Kansas question, remarkable for lucidity of statement and beauty of diction...the position & growth of the Territory of Kansas, against which he charged that a crime had been committed which was without example in the annals of the post...That crime was the forcible infliction of slavery on a reluctant people...He announced accordingly that his task would be divided under three heads--first, the crime against Kansas in its origin and extent; secondly, the apologies for the crime; and, thirdly, the true remedy...".
The editorial continues on to take over a full column. It was May 22 when the beating occurred.
Terrific to have this report in this famous title from the nation's capital, typically the first newspaper to report events from Congress and the administration as it was the unofficial "mouthpiece" of the government.
Four pages, a bit irregular at the spine from disbinding with some appropriate archival repairs, otherwise in very nice condition. The folder size noted is for the issue folded in half.

Category: Pre-Civil War

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