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Americans complain about taxation without representation...



Item # 652965

July 21, 1768

THE LONDON CHRONICLE, England, July 21, 1768  Fully half of page 5 is taken up with an excellent letter of protest headed: "A  Letter Lately Sent from the Hon. House of Representatives of Massachusetts Bay to the Right Hon. the Earl of Chatham" in England.
This very pointed letter makes clear the trouble the American colonists were having with the King & Parliament at the time: taxation without representation. A few portions of the letter include: "...find your Lordship so explicitly declaring your sentiments in that grand principle in nature, that what a man hath honestly acquired, is absolutely and uncontrollably his own. This principle is established as a fundamental rule in the British constitution...But...in this cardinal point, it is truly mortifying to many...a different sentiment seems of late to have prevailed...refer your Lordship to an Act...imposing duties on the Americans who were not represented with the sole and express purposed of raising a revenue!..." with much more. And further on: "...The colonies as this House humbly conceive, cannot be represented in the British Parliament..." with more (see).
A terrific letter which defined the anger of the American colonists at the time, and certainly issue which would lead to the Revolutionary War seven years later.
Another great report on page 6 notes in part: "...received from Boston...that a ship going into Boston harbour was visited by the officers of the Customs...upon which the populace rose & drove the Commissioners out of the town, and damaged (some say destroyed) their houses. The Commissioners, in consequence of these violences, were obliged to take refuge on board a frigate in the harbour...".
Eight pages, 8 1/2 by 11 inches, some light dirtiness at ftpg. folds, nice condition.

Item from Catalog 272 (released for July, 2018)...

Category: British

No Longer Available