Home > In a Washington, D.C. newspaper - Charles Sumner's 1st major Senatorial speech.. References "Uncle Tom's Cabin" as support...
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In a Washington, D.C. newspaper - Charles Sumner's 1st major Senatorial speech..

References "Uncle Tom's Cabin" as support...



Item # 652795

September 2, 1852

THE NATIONAL ERA, September 2, 1852

* Charles Sumner's 1st major speech before the Senate
* Printed in a Washington, D.C. newspaper
* Decries the Fugitive Slave Act - references public reaction to "Uncle Tom's Cabin" as support


On August 26, 1852, the newly elected senator, Charles Sumner, in defiance of strenuous efforts to the contrary, delivered his 1st major speech before the Senate, taking over 3 hours. During his speech he spoke out against slavery in general, and The Fugitive Slave Act in particular, and instantly establishing himself as a staunch and passionate abolitionist. Starting on the front page and continuing in force through mid-page 3 is what appears to be the entire text of his speech (although not confirmed). During the speech, and included in the coverage, is the portion where he referenced Harriet Beecher Stowe's "Uncle Tom's Cabin": "In a brief period, nearly 100,000 copies of Uncle Tom's Cabin have already circulated. But this extraordinary and sudden success - surpassing all other instances in the records of literature - cannot be regarded merely as the triumph of genius.  Higher far than this, it is the testimony of the people, by an unprecedented act, against the Fugitive Slave Bill."

Note: Although not present within this issue, for historical reference: After Senator Sumner completed his speech, another senator suggested that there not be a response to the speech. He is quoted as saying: "The ravings of a maniac may sometimes be dangerous, but the barking of a puppy never did any harm."

Also on page 3 under the heading, "Speech of Mr. Sumner, is an explanation to the readers as to why the editor made the decision to dedicate nearly three-fourths of the issue to Sumner's speech.

It is great to have this speech from a Washington, D.C. newspaper.

Complete in 4 pages; in very good, evenly toned condition. See images for details. Due to the large size of this title and the fact that it had already been folded at the mid-fold, if purchasing a storage folder, a 24" by 18" folder is suggested (and the issue has been tagged as such).

Category: Pre-Civil War

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