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Great issue on the Battle of Ticonderoga...



Item # 646900

August 27, 1777

THE EDINBURGH EVENING COURANT, Scotland, August 27, 1777 

* Siege of Fort Ticonderoga
* American Revolutionary War
* General John Burgoyne victory


The front page has: "...a correct & authentic distribution of the British forces under the command of Sir William Howe, from an officer of distinction just arrived from New York." with a nice accounting of the troops (see photos). This is followed by an interesting item noting: "The paper currency of the American Congress is disgraced with an emblematical etching that is the most striking comment on their treasonable & rebellious principles..." with a description (see).
Page 2 has a detailed account of military events in New Jersey (see) in a letter signed in type by: W. Howe. But the best item follows, being two reports concerning the Battle of Ticonderoga, one a letter from General Howe to Lord G. Germaine dated July 15, 1777 noting; "...I have this day had the satisfaction to receive a letter from Lieut. General Burgoyne with a confirmation of his being before Ticonderoga...Intelligence otherwise received leaves no room to doubt his being in possession, but it does not come from authority so certain as to justify me in a positive declaration of the fact..." with more. Then the referenced letter from Burgoyne to Howe dated at the camp before Ticonderoga, July 2 includes: "I wait only some necessaries of the heavy artillery...to open batteries upon Ticonderoga. The army is in the fullest powers of health & spirit. I have a large body of savages...Ticonderoga reduced, I shall leave behind me proper engineers to put it in an impregnable state...My force therefore will be left complete for future operations."
But the best account is on page 3 which has a brief item: "...that Ticonderoga is taken & that Lake George & the country round is in our possession..." which prefaces a great letter datelined at "Camp at Skenesborough, 10th July 1777" which gives the particulars of the Battle of Ticonderoga, ending with the: "List of Officers killed & Wounded of General Fraser's Advanced corps at Hubberton, 7th July 1777". This is followed by: "The Rebel's Account" taken from the Penna. Evening Post, having a letter from General Schuyler to General Washington datelined at Saratoga, July 7th, 1777 which notes in part: "...who was at Ticonderoga, he informs me that on Saturday it has been agreed to retreat from Ticonderoga & Mount Independence...Sunday morning General St. Clair, with the rest of the general officers & the army, marched out of the lines at Mount Independence...they were overtaken by the enemies' vessels in which we lost all our ammunition..." with more.
This is then followed by an even more lengthy account in an: "Extract of a Letter from a Gentleman in Albany to his Friends in Phila. dated July 10, 1777" which begins: "The 7th inst. we had a report of the loss of Ticonderoga and Mount Independence without a single circumstance or consequence not easily to be credited..." followed my much detail as to what happened.
A terrific issue on the historic Battle of Ticonderoga, a significant defeat for the Americans at the hands of General Burgoyne, and with perspectives from not only several accounts but both American and British sources.
Four pages, folio size, some period inked notations at advertisements mostly to the front page (likely the editor's copy), nice condition.

Category: British

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$465.00