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War is inevitable in Texas...



Item # 642582

October 31, 1835

NILES' WEEKLY REGISTER, Baltimore, Oct. 31, 1835  Inside has over a full page headed: "Texas" telling of some early battles there with much interesting reading, including a cautionary note: "I do not think it would be prudent for you I& our family to come to Texas until the affairs of the country assume a more peaceful aspect..." and also: "...We look upon independence as absolutely certain. We have now the command of all the harbors in Texas & have driven out every garrison from the interior of our fine country...and in six weeks expect to give to the world a Declaration of Independence..." with much more. There is also a letter signed in type: Samuel Houston, which includes: "...War in defense of our rights, our oaths and our constitution, in inevitable in Texas!...Let each man come with a good rifle & 100 rounds of ammunition--and come soon. Our war cry is 'liberty or death'..." (see). And yet another letter begins: "War is our only resource, war is upon us..." with more, and this is followed by a letter signed in type: S. F. Austin, which begins: "War is upon us--there is now no remedy..." (see). A rousing letter by B. T. Archer mentions: "Fellow citizens, again we summon you to arms. Let us take the field, defeat Cos, take San Antonio, drive every soldier from our limits...place Texas in a situation...what she is destined to be...the pride & boast of our lives...".
A fine issue on the beginning of the Texas war for independence. Sixteen pages, 6 1/4 by 9 1/2 inches, scattered lite foxing, otherwise in nice condition.

This small size newspaper began in 1811 and was a prime source for national political news of the first half of the19th century. As noted in Wikipedia, this title: "...(was) one of the most widely-circulated magazines in the United States...Devoted primarily to politics...considered an important source for the history of the period."

Category: Pre-Civil War

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