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Trouble in America...



Item # 642514 THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE, London, February, 1769  Among the articles in this issue are: "A Description of the Copper Mine at Ecton Hill"; over two pages on: "A Continuation of the Most Interesting transactions in America..." continued from the January issue, which has some great reading concerning the troubles between America & England, one portion noting: "Resolved...That no tax under any name or denomination...ought to be imposed or levied upon the persons, estates or property of his majesty's good subjects within this colony but of their free gift by their representatives lawfully convened in general assembly." with much, much more (see for portions). Further reports concerning America, including a letter from the Massachusetts governor, take another two pages. This is followed by an article on slavery.
Near the back are a few bits headed: "American News" with reports from Boston, New York, and an item on an insurrection in New Orleans (see). The "Historical Chronicle" also has some American content, including: "...houses of parliament waited on his majesty...respecting the critical situation of American affairs...they approve the measures that have been taken to put a stop to those disorders..." with more (see).
Included are both plates called for, including a nice foldout map of: "The Road from London to Cambridge, Ely and Kings Lynn", "from Oxford to Cambridge", and more - which measures 12 inches wide, and another full page plate with two images (see).
Complete in 56 pages, full title/contents pave with an engraving of St. John's Gate, 5 by 8 1/2 inches, very nice condition.

A very nice magazine from during the midst of troubles leading to the Revolutionary War from the "mother country" with a wide range of varied content. This was the first periodical to use the word "magazine" in its title, having begun in 1731 and lasting until 1907.

Category: The 1600's and 1700's

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