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Discontent brews in the colonies... Taxation without representation...



Item # 639216

August 22, 1768

THE BOSTON CHRONICLE, Massachusetts, Aug. 22, 1768 

* Taxation without representation
* Pre Revolutionary War tensions


An inside page item headed: "America" begins: "The last advices from the Creek country inform us that all the men in the upper towns able to bear arms were gone & going out against a body of the Chocktaws & Chickesaws..." with more (see). And a report from Charleston includes: "...that the governor at home seems more determined than ever that the revenue acts, to operate in America, shall be enforced..." (see). 
An excellent report from Philadelphia includes: "...duties for the sole & express purpose of raising a revenue have been lately imposed by acts of parliament...imported into these colonies. This we consider as an infringement of our natural & constitutional rights: it is a taxation of us by persons who do not & cannot represent us..." with more, taking over half a page (see). Also a note that: "...celebrated...at the tree of Liberty ...being the anniversary on which the first opposition was made to the stamp act...".
Eight pages, 8 1/2 by 10 1/4 inches, very nice condition.

This newspaper published only briefly from December 21, 1767 until 1770. The publishers, John Mein and John Fleeming, were both from Scotland. The Chronicle was a Loyalist paper in the time before the American Revolution. In its second year, Mein printed names in the paper that accused some colonial merchants of breaking a British non-importation agreement. In response, Mein's name appeared on a list of merchants who violated the trade agreement. Mein retaliated by accusing the Merchants' Committee of using the non-importation agreement for illegal profiteering. The irritated readership ransacked the offices of the Chronicle, and ultimately, it ceased operations in 1770. (credit Wikipedia)

Category: The 1600's and 1700's

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