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The Netherlands... with a map of Northern Europe...



Item # 619573
THE GENTLEMAN'S MAGAZINE, London, June, 1744

* James Oglethorpe in Georgia

An inside page has a report which includes: "...had a commission to be engineer with a salary of 15s a day, given him by Gen. James Oglethorpe who also conferred upon him many other favours having under pretence of sickness, left Georgia when the Spaniards came up to invade the same with a fleet and army of between 4 and 5,000 men, whilst Gen. Oglethorpe was doing his duty under great difficulty, upon his arrival in England, filed against him 19 articles & summoned many officers and soldiers from Georgia for witnesses..." with more (see photo). An early item on the troubles of Oglethorpe.
Over 19 pages at the beginning of the issue are taken up with reports on events in Parliament under the guise of: "Proceedings & Debates in the Senate of Lilliput" as direct reporting on Parliamentary events was prohibited.
Among various other articles found in this issue as noted in the table of contents are: "A Copy of Mr. Pope's Last Will" which is signed by him in type: Alexander Pope. Also: "Character of Alexander Pope".
There is also an article: "A Problem Concerning the late Comet" which includes a geometric illustration (see photo).
Included with this issue is a foldout map titled: "The Austrian & French NETHERLANDS agreeable to the Barrier concluded at Antwerp and relative to the Present War." which is very displayable (see photo).
Complete in 54 pages, 5 by 8 1/4 inches, full title/index page containing an engraving of St. John's Gate. Small library stamps at the bottom of two pages do not cause loss of readability.

A very nice pre-Revolutionary War magazine from the "mother country" with a wide range of varied content including news of the day, political reports, literary items, and other unusual tidbits. This was the first periodical to use the word "magazine" in its title, having begun in 1731 and lasting until 1907.

Category: The 1600's and 1700's

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