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Wanting to put the Quakers in prison...



Item # 610308

September 6, 1777

THE PENNSYLVANIA EVENING POST, Philadelphia, Sept. 6, 1777 

* Rare Revolutionary War title from America

Most of the front page is taken up with a report from congress dated Aug. 28, 1777, concerning the contrary intents of the Quakers in Philadelphia concerning the war, noting in part: "...people commonly called Quakers, render it certain & notorious that those persons are, with much rancour & bitterness, disaffected to the American cause....will have it in their power, so there is no doubt it will be their inclination, to communicate intelligence to the enemy & in various other ways to injure the councils & arms of America. That when the enemy, in the month of December, 1776, were bending their progress towards the city of Philadelphia...Resolved, That it be earnestly recommended to the supreme executive council of the state of Pennsylvania...to apprehend, that these persons maintain a correspondence & connection highly prejudicial to the public safety not only in this state but in the respective states of America...to apprehend & secure all persons, as well among the people called Quakers...who have...evidenced a disposition inimical to the cause of America...That Congress approve of the Quakers, prisoners, being sent to Virginia..." with much more.
Page 2 has an item from Chester Town noting: "The enemy have robbed our people of about 100 Negroes...When they applied for their Negroes a day was formally appointed for a restoration & when the day came, they were told they should be paid for them when the army returned." Also: "Our shores are crowed with dead bodies, both men and horse."
Page 3 has a nice about an item published: "The Rise & continuance of the Substitutes in the Continental Army" by Robert Bell, who printed "Common Sense".
Four pages, never-trimmed margins, 8 1/4 by 10 inches, a bit irregular at the spine, great condition.

Category: American

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$358.00