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From the 1600's by a woman publisher...



Item # 600518 THE OBSERVATOR, London, England, 1682  A dialogue newspaper founded by Sir Roger L'Estrange, a Tory pamphleteer, as a vehicle for attacking dissenters and Whigs. This early singlesheet newspaper has the old style type making it great for framing (see photo) particularly with the over 300+ year old date clearly visible in the dateline.
This is a handsome dialogue newspaper founded by Sir Roger L'Estrange, a Tory pamphleteer, as a vehicle for attacking dissenters and Whigs. Done in a dialogue format, between Whig & Tory. This early single sheet newspaper has the old style type making it great for framing, but the most intriguing aspect of this issue is that the imprint at the bottom of the back page reads: "London, Printed for Joanna Brome, at the Gun in S. Paul's Church-yard."
I believe this to be the earliest periodical we have offered published by a woman. Could it be the earliest woman publisher to be found within a newspaper?
The photo is "generic" although the issue you will receive will be dated within the range of 1682-1686 and will have a similar look. Measures 8 x 12 inches and is printed on high quality, rag paper.  Very good condition.

Wikipedia notes: "In 1679, he assailed Shaftesbury and the exclusionists in pamphlets which won him the royal regard. During the next year, he was in the thick of the controversy about the Popish plot, labouring to allay the popular fury against Roman Catholics. His denunciations of Oates and other informers led to machinations against himself. He was falsely accused of endeavouring by bribery to secure the defamation of Oates, and he was charged with being a papist. He was acquitted by the council; but public opinion ran so high against him that he fled, for a short time, to Holland. To employ a phrase in the title of one of his tracts, a whole Litter of Libellers assailed him at this season; but the Dog Towzer was not to be thus daunted. He returned in February, 1681, and kept the press busy, not only with apologetic pamphlets, but with bitter assaults upon the dissenters and with one of the most important of his works, his political newspaper The Observator: In Question and Answer.

Category: The 1600's and 1700's

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