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The Gettysburg Address in this famous anti-slavery newspaper...



Item # 586817

November 27, 1863

THE LIBERATOR, Boston, Nov. 27, 1863  This is the famous anti-slavery newspaper by William Lloyd Garrison with an ornate masthead which features a scene of a slave auction and a scene of slaves being emancipated.
About two-thirds of the first column on page 3 are taken up with an article headed: "The Consecration Of The Gettysburg Cemetery" with a dateline of Gettysburg, Pa., Nov. 19, 1863. The article is uncommon lengthy on the dedication ceremonies at Gettysburg, one portion noting: "...The President & members of the Cabinet...took places on the stand. The President seated himself between Mr. Seward and Mr. Everett, after a reception marked with the respect & perfect silence due the solemnities of the occasion..." with more. Shortly thereafter, and prefaced with: "President Lincoln then delivered the following dedicatory speech:..." is the complete printing of arguably the most famous speech of the 19th century, now known as the Gettysburg Address. This text begins with the famous words: "Four score and seven years ago..." (see).
At its conclusion is: "Three cheers were here given for the President and the Governors of the States...After the dedication services at Gettysburg, President Lincoln proceeded to the church arm-in-arm with the renowned Tom Burns, the brave old man at Gettysburg who shouldered his musket & joined our forces at the time of the battle." (see).
This is the complete 4 page issue which contains many other articles relating to the Civil War and slavery. Terrific to have this notable speech in an anti-slavery newspaper.
This issue is affected by a repair at the bottom of both leaves causing loss of text but fortunately no loss to the Gettysburg content. Some foxing with brown spots which can be seen in the photos as well.

Category: The 20th Century

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