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Much about the Indians...



Item # 585376

April 18, 1768

THE BOSTON CHRONICLE, April 18, 1768 

* Colonial America

Inside has a column headed: "America" with reports from Charleston providing news from the Southern part of the colonies, and that: "...Brig. General Haldimand had withdrawn the garrison of Tombrige-Fort & intended to establish another more advantageous post on Lake Pontchartrain; That the Creek & Chactau Indians continued the war against each other with unabating vigour...That the French & Spaniards still remained together at New Orleans..." and also that: "...the settlement & population of East Florida goes on with amazing rapidity..." (see).
A report from Philadelphia reports on a recent meeting with: "...70 of the tribes inhabiting the banks of the Susquehanna. the greatest grievance complained of by the Indians was the neglect of the confirmation of the boundary they had agreed to some years since, which was much aggravated by the white people settling on their lands...". Another item notes: "The parliament have resolved that 70,000 pounds sterling of the duties to be raised in America...shall be applied towards the defending, protecting and securing the British colonies in America."
Eight pages, 8 1/2 by 10 1/4 inches, the last leaf has a small 1/4 by 2 1/2 inch piece clipped out, otherwise in very nice, clean condition. A nice opportunity for a colonial newspaper at a very reasonable price.
This newspaper published only briefly from December 21, 1767 until 1770. The publishers, John Mein and John Fleeming, were both from Scotland. The Chronicle was a Loyalist paper in the time before the American Revolution. In its second year, Mein printed names in the paper that accused some colonial merchants of breaking a British non-importation agreement. In response, Mein's name appeared on a list of merchants who violated the trade agreement. Mein retaliated by accusing the Merchants' Committee of using the non-importation agreement for illegal profiteering. The irritated readership ransacked the offices of the Chronicle, and ultimately, it ceased operations in 1770. (credit Wikipedia)

Category: The 1600's and 1700's

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