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Eight Nazi Saboteurs caught...



Item # 583363

June 28, 1942

THE DETROIT FREE PRESS, Detroit, Michigan, June 28, 1942  

* FBI Agents Grab Several Accomplices of Eight Nazi Saboteurs; Others Sought
* German Agents, Landed to Blast U.S. Plants

This 30+ page newspaper has nice banner headline on the front page: "Eight German Saboteurs Arrested by FBI After Landing on U.S. Coast from U-Boats" with subheads.

Other news, sports and advertisements of the day throughout including much on World War II and period advertisements. Small address stamp within masthead, minor spine wear, otherwise good condition.

Wikipedia notes: Their mission was to stage sabotage attacks on American economic targets: hydro-electric plants at Niagara Falls; the Aluminum Company of America's plants in Illinois, Tennessee and New York; locks on the Ohio River near Louisville, Kentucky; the Horseshoe Curve, a crucial railroad pass near Altoona, Pennsylvania, as well as the Pennsylvania Railroad's repair shops at Altoona [1] ; a cryolite plant in Philadelphia; Hell Gate Bridge in New York; and Pennsylvania Station in Newark, New Jersey. They were given a quick course in sabotage techniques, given nearly $175,000 in American money and put aboard two submarines to land on the east coast of the United States.
Amagansett Coast Guard station at Atlantic Avenue Beach in Amagansett, New York. The station was moved in 1966 to a private residence to protect it from demolition. In May 2007, the structure was moved back to near its original location.
Amagansett Coast Guard station at Atlantic Avenue Beach in Amagansett, New York. The station was moved in 1966 to a private residence to protect it from demolition. In May 2007, the structure was moved back to near its original location.

On June 13, 1942, the first submarine (U-202 the Innsbruck) [2] landed in Amagansett, New York. This is about 115 miles east of New York City, on Long Island, at what today is Atlantic Avenue beach. It was carrying George Dasch, who was the head of the team, and three other saboteurs (Burger, Quirin, and Henck). The team came ashore wearing military uniforms so that if they were captured they would be classified as prisoners of war rather than spies. They also brought ashore, and buried, enough explosives, primers, and incendiaries to support an expected two-year career in the sabotage of American defense-related production.[3] The group had not fully changed into civilian clothes when an unarmed Coast Guardsman, John C. Cullen, spotted the Germans. One of them tried to bribe him. Cullen, however, returned to his station and reported the encounter to his superiors. By that time the Germans, weary from their transatlantic trip, had taken a train into New York City.

The second submarine, U-584, with the other four-member team headed by Kerling, landed at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, south of Jacksonville on June 16, 1942. Without any incident, this second group of Germans started their mission by boarding trains to Chicago and Cincinnati.

Category: World War II

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