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Salaries for the President & Vice President set...

George Washington and Christianity... letters to the Connecticut legislature and New Haven Congregations...



Item # 582332

October 24, 1789

GAZETTE OF THE UNITED STATES, New York, October 24, 1789 

* Washington and Christianity... letter to the Connecticut legislature... letter to the New Haven Congregations
* Salaries for the President and Vice President
* George Washington and John Adams signatures


The front page has more than a full column taken up with a letter written in Holland in 1780 by the now Vice President, concerning alliances during the Revolutionary War, & signed in type: John Adams.

Of significance is the back page Act of Congress titled: "An ACT for Allowing a Compensation to the President and Vice President of the United States" noting that the pay shall be $25,000 and $5000 respectively (see photos), signed in type by both: George Washington and John Adams (see photos). This is followed by: "Proceedings Of Congress" which include the first rules passed by Congress for the conduct of the newly formed Senate (see photos).

Page 2 notes that the Mass. governor has issued a Proclamation for a "day of public thanksgiving" following the issuance of the same by the President of the United States. Also a letter from Connecticut: "To George Washington, President of the United States" signed in type by the governor: Samuel Huntington. With his response on page 3 signed in type: G. Washington (see photos). This is followed by an "...address of the Congregational Ministers of the city of New Haven, to the President of the United States" followed by his response signed in type: G. Washington.

Also mentions that: "...and of their warm attachment to the Constitution which he [Washington] is by their suffrages appointed to administer--A Constitution which is equally dear to him--& the adoption of which he appears to consider in all his answers to the Address as the most happy & important acquisition of this highly favored nation. How important is it that the people of the United States should be tenacious of their own adopted Constitution which secures to them & their posterity, that precious palladium of liberty, a free & just representation in their National Legislature!..." followed by: "The President of the United States...will arrive in Boston this day...".

Considered by many as the most significant newspaper of the 18th century particularly during this, the formative year of the new federal government, as the Gazette was the voice of all matters political. Most pronouncements from Congress & the President were printed first in this newspaper.

Complete in 4 pages, some foxing at the margins, light damp stain at the lower right, minor margin tears.

Featured in "Newspapers that shaped the world..."

Category: The 1600's and 1700's

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