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Cy Young death in 1955....



Item # 571128

July 18, 1961

FITCHBURG SENTINEL, Massachusetts, July 18, 1961

* Ty Cobb death
* Detroit Tigers
* Major league baseball MLB


This 24 page newspaper has a three column headline on the front page: "Ty Cobb, Baseball Great, Dead At 74" with caption: "Record Stands As Towering Monument" and photo of Cobb. (see)

Tells of the death of famous baseball star Ty Cobb.

Other news of the day. Good condition.

wikipedia notes:
Tyrus Raymond "Ty" Cobb (December 18, 1886 – July 17, 1961), nicknamed "The Georgia Peach," was an American outfielder in baseball born in Narrows, Georgia. Cobb spent 22 seasons with the Detroit Tigers, the last six as the team's player-manager, and finished his career with the Philadelphia Athletics.

Cobb is widely regarded as one of the best players of all time. In 1936, Cobb received the most votes of any player on the inaugural Baseball Hall of Fame ballot, receiving 222 out of a possible 226 votes.

Cobb is widely credited with setting 90 Major League Baseball records during his career. He still holds several records as of 2010, including the highest career batting average (.366) and most career batting titles with 11 (or 12, depending on source).[9] He retained many other records for almost a half century or more, including most career hits until 1985 (4,189 or 4,191, depending on source), most career runs (2,245 or 2,246 depending on source) until 2001, most career games played (3,035) and at bats (11,429 or 11,434 depending on source) until 1974, and the modern record for most career stolen bases (892) until 1977. He committed 271 errors in his career, the most by any American League outfielder.

Cobb's legacy as an athlete has sometimes been overshadowed by his surly temperament and aggressive playing style, which was described by the Detroit Free Press as "daring to the point of dementia."

Category: The 20th Century

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